New Digital Programs Debut for the Fall at the Walters Art Museum

(BALTIMORE – September 30, 2020) — The Walters Art Museum is excited to announce its free digital programs for the fall, including artist talks, curator talks, live performances, and the popular Día de los Muertos Celebration.

The Walters reopened in September after a six-month closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “During the closure we pioneered new digital content that we are thrilled to continue as the museum progresses through our reopen plan,” said Kate Burgin, Deputy Director of Engagement and Strategic Initiatives. “The continued focus on digital programs allows us to reach a larger audience while the museum is open at reduced capacity and with adjusted hours.”

The new programs highlight both the visible and behind-the-scenes work of the museum, including collaborations with artists in the Baltimore region and partnerships with community organizations. Each year, the Walters collaborates with over 300 local artists to bring unique and innovative programs to the museum. The Día de los Muertos celebration, for instance, features conversations with Baltimore’s Latinx community and the work of local artisans and dancers.

This fall’s programming features talks that explore issues of contemporary and historical Black life and identity, featuring Baltimore artists Nakeya Brown, McKinley Wallace III, 2019 Sondheim winner Akea Brionne Brown, and LaToya Hobbs.

“Many of the upcoming programs are meant to amplify the voices of Black artists,” said Joy Davis, Manager of Adult and Community Programs. “We want to use these programs to support local talent, strengthen accountability to our community, and to facilitate dialogue and challenging conversations about art, museums, and the Walters collection.”

The Walters digital resources can be accessed from the Virtual Museum page of the museum’s website www.thewalters.org. Live programs debut on FacebookInstagram, and the Walters YouTube channel.

OCTOBER
Boshell Lecture: Polychromy and You, with Sarah Bond, Mark Abbe, and Angie Elliot, moderated by Lisa Anderson-Zhu
Thursday, October 1, 5:30 p.m.

Professor and conservator Mark Abbe and professor and writer Sarah Bond give their perspectives on polychromy, or the art of employing many colors in decoration, such as in sculpture or architecture. Through the lens of Greek and Roman sculpture, they discuss how we see ourselves. Moderated by Lisa Anderson-Zhu, Associate Curator of Ancient Mediterranean Art 5,000-300 CE, this Boshell Lecture is inspired by the Walters Roman marble Head of Aphrodite, which displays polychromy and gilding that is still visible today.

This program is generously funded by the Boshell Foundation.

 

FAA Lecture: The Buddha in the Art of Burma (Myanmar)
Tuesday, October 6, 5:30 p.m.

By the early 12th century, unique foundation myths related to the life of the historical Buddha were recorded in Burma (Myanmar). Focusing on images of the Buddha from the Walters collection, this talk sponsored by the Walters Friends of Asian Art considers Burma’s striking range of representations of the Buddha that has developed over time. Adriana Proser, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Quincy Scott Curator of Asian Art, touches on the country’s long tradition of Theravada Buddhism, international relationships, and ethnic diversity in relation to these works.

 

Artist Talk: Nakeya Brown
Thursday, October 8, 5:30 p.m.

Nakeya Brown is a California born, Baltimore-based artist who uses photography to unpack the Black hair industry, Caribbean identity, and modern still lifes of the African diaspora. In conversation with Joy Davis, Manager of Adult and Community Programs, Nakeya will discuss complementary objects from the Walters collection in concert with her art series “Mass Production Comes Home” and “X-pressions: Black Beauty Still Lifes.”

Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

Talk: Indigenous Futures with Ashley Minner
Tuesday, October 13, 5:30 p.m.

Local community artist and folklorist Ashley Minner observes Indigenous People’s Day through conversation with Joy Davis, Manager of Adult and Community Programs. They discuss Ashley’s practice, local statues, and the history of indigenous peoples in Baltimore.

 

Performance: An Evening with Morgan State University Alumni and Samuel Springer
Thursday, October 15, 5:30 p.m.

Join us for a vocal concert with music provided by professor Samuel Springer in collaboration with students from the Fine and Performing Arts Department at Morgan State University. Grab a glass of your favorite beverage and enjoy the lovely sounds of voice and piano brought to your home.

Presented in partnership with Morgan State University. TThursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

Storytime: Cultural Traditions Día de los Muertos
Saturday, October 17, 11 a.m.

Join the Walters Art Museum, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and Artesanas Mexicanas from the Creative Alliance for a special edition of Storytime. We’ll read a book exploring the cultural traditions and celebration of Día de los Muertos (Day of the Day), create artwork inspired by an object in the Walters ancient Americas collection, and learn about creating an ofrenda (altar) at home.

 

Talk: Body Language: What Makes Figure Painting Speak with Joaneath Spicer
Thursday, October 22, 5:30 p.m.

Humans often respond more to body language than to spoken words. Join Joaneath Spicer, the James A. Murnaghan Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Art, in a live lecture that explores how artists in the past conveyed emotion and meaning.

Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

Día de los Muertos
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, October 29—October 31, 5:30 p.m.

Celebrate Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) with the Walters online. Enjoy conversations with Baltimore’s Latinx community and the work of local artisans and dancers. Visitors can contribute to a digital community altar and take part in virtual tours in English and Spanish and art-making activities para todos.

Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

NOVEMBER
Artist Talk: McKinley Wallace III
Thursday, November 5, 5:30 p.m.

Baltimore-based artist McKinley Wallace III aims to create illustrative mixed-media paintings of people caught within, and absent from, site-specific places in distress. McKinley’s works and artistic mission converge in a singular thesis: to uncover the forgotten pieces of humanity and its aggression. Keondra Prier, Manager of School Programs, joins him for a discussion of his work and its connection to paintings in the Walters collections.

Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

Performance: Peabody in the Evening
Thursday, November 12, 5:30 p.m.

Inspired by artworks in the Walters collection, a soloist from the Peabody Institute delivers a live digital concert from their space to yours.

Presented in partnership with the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University.Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

Trivia Night: Art History
Tuesday, November 17, 5:30 p.m.

Merge your love of trivia with art history. Battle your friends, family, or colleagues in a head-to-head competition with questions related to art, art history, and fun facts from the Walters Art Museum.

 

How To: Moving Sculpture
Thursday, November 19, 5:30 p.m.

Learn secrets about how sculptures are moved throughout the museum with Mike McKee, Head of Installations and Production. He introduces the planning process he has developed over 25 years at the Walters and shows us the behind-the-scenes world of his job through wonderful interactive storyboards.

Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE.

 

Artist Talk: Akea Brionne Brown
Tuesday, November 24, 5:30 p.m.

Baltimore-based photographer, writer, curator, and researcher Akea Brionne Brown investigates the implications of historical, racial, and social structures in relation to the development of contemporary Black life and identity in America. In conversation, Akea discusses her approaches to photography, the connections to life in America depicted in our collection, as well as her collaborative works Shades Collective and Diary of Angry Black Women.

 

DECEMBER
Lecture: A Child of African Ancestry At The Medici Court with Joaneath Spicer
Tuesday, December 1, 5:30 p.m.

Around 1539, Giulia de Medici, who was the daughter of the duke of Florence and the granddaughter of an enslaved African, was painted next to her cousin, the widowed Maria Salviati with whom she lived. Join Joaneath Spicer, James A. Murnaghan Curator of Renaissance and Baroque Art, for her talk addressing why Giulia was initially painted out of the portrait and her rediscovery in the 20th century. This famous painting played a central role in the Walters groundbreaking exhibition Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe (2012-2013).

 

For The Love Of Bronzes with Lisa Anderson Zhu and Merle Davison
Tuesday, December 8, 5:30 p.m.

Artworks and everyday objects made of bronze have been crafted using the lost-wax process for almost 4,000 years. Using this ancient process as a starting point, Associate Curator of Ancient Mediterranean Art Lisa Anderson-Zhu, Associate Curator of Ancient Mediterranean Art, 5,000-300 CE, talks with Merle Davison, a Baltimore-based, self-taught artist, about the process she uses to create her bronze sculptures.

 

Performances: Peabody in the Evening
Thursday, December 10, 5:30 p.m.

Inspired by artworks in the Walters collection, a soloist from the Peabody Institute will deliver a live digital concert from their space to yours.

Presented in partnership with the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University. Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE. 

Lecture: Handwritten Art: Calligraphy in Asian and Islamic Cultures with Adriana Proser, Ashley Dimmig, and Dany Chan
Tuesday, December 15, 5:30 p.m.

Calligraphy remains one of the world’s most beautiful, dynamic, and powerful artistic expressions. Join Adriana Proser, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Quincy Scott Curator of Asian Art; Dany Chan, Assistant Curator of Asian Art; and Ashley Dimmig, Wieler-Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow in Islamic Art, as they discuss a selection of calligraphy in the Walters collections.

 

Artist Talk: LaToya M. Hobbs
Thursday, December 17, 5:30 p.m.

Baltimore-based artist LaToya M. Hobbs’ work deals with figurative imagery that addresses beauty, cultural identity, and womanhood as they relate to women of the African Diaspora. In conversation with Keondra Prier, Manager of School Programs, LaToya shares her experiences as a portraitist, a mother, and the 2020 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize Winner. LaToya and Keondra will also discuss how teaching and educational styles relate to creating art.

Thursday programs are sponsored by BGE. 

ABOUT THE WALTERS ART MUSEUM
The Walters Art Museum is a cultural hub in the heart of Baltimore, located in the city’s Mount Vernon neighborhood. The museum’s collection spans more than seven millennia, from 5000 BCE to the 21st century, and encompasses 36,000 objects from around the world. Walking through the museum’s historic buildings, visitors encounter a stunning panorama of thousands of years of art, from romantic 19th-century images of French gardens to mesmerizing Ethiopian icons, richly illuminated Qur’ans and Gospel books, ancient Roman sarcophagi, and serene images of the Buddha. Since its founding, the Walters’ mission has been to bring art and people together to create a place where people of every background can be touched by art. As part of this commitment, admission to the museum and special exhibitions is always free.

Visitor Information
Admission to the museum is free. The Walters Art Museum is located at 600 N. Charles St., north of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. For general museum information, call 410-547-9000 or visit thewalters.org.

Free access to the Walters Art Museum, online and in person, is made possible through the combined generosity of individual members and donors, foundations, corporations, and grants from the City of Baltimore, Maryland State Arts Council, Citizens of Baltimore County, and Howard County Government and Howard County Arts Council.